English Bible History Before The KJV – Part 3

How The Book of Yahweh was taken from the people to the time when it was restored and given back is a long an arduous journey. House of Yahweh newsletter captures English Bible History for all to read.

Excerpt from their monthly publication…

Follow-up to Part 1 & 2 on English Bible History, text from greatsite.com

Having God’s Word available to the public in the language of the common man, English, would have meant disaster to the church.

No longer would they control access to the scriptures.

If people were able to read the Bible in their own tongue, the church’s income and power would crumble.

They could not possibly continue to get away with selling indulgences (the forgiveness of sins) or selling the release of loved ones from a church-manufactured “Purgatory”.

People would begin to challenge the church’s authority if the church were exposed as frauds and thieves. The contradictions between what God’s Word said, and what the priests taught, would open the public’s eyes and the truth would set them free from the grip of fear that the institutional church held.

The veneration of church-canonized Saints and Mary would be called into question. The availability of the scriptures in English was the biggest threat imaginable to the wicked church.

Neither side would give up without a fight.

Ironically, Tyndale’s biggest customer was the King’s men, who would buy up every copy available to burn them… and Tyndale used their money to print even more!

In the end, Tyndale was caught: betrayed by an Englishman that he had befriended.

Tyndale was incarcerated for 500 days before he was strangled and burned at the stake in 1536.

Myles Coverdale and John “Thomas Matthew” Rogers had remained loyal disciples the last six years of Tyndale’s life, and they carried the English Bible project forward and even accelerated it.

Coverdale finished translating the Old Testament, and in 1535 he printed the first complete Bible in the English language, making use of Luther’s German text and the Latin as sources.

Thus, the first complete English Bible was printed on October 4, 1535, and is known as the Coverdale Bible.

In 1539, Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, hired Myles Coverdale at the bequest of King Henry VIII to publish the “Great Bible”.

It became the first English Bible authorized for public use, as it was distributed to every church, chained to the pulpit, and a reader was even provided so that the illiterate could hear the Word of God in plain English.

In the 1550’s, the Church at Geneva, Switzerland, was very sympathetic to the reformer refugees and was one of only a few safe havens for a desperate people.

The great Reformer of the Scottish Church, the Church of Geneva determined to produce a Bible that would educate their families while they continued in exile.

The New Testament was completed in 1557, and the complete Bible was first published in 1560. It became known as the Geneva Bible.
Greatsite.com

See Part 4 to conclude English Bible History, thanks to greatsite.com

To read this newsletter: http://yahweh.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/2-2016-nl.pdf
For more information visit www.yahweh.com or www.yisraylhawkins.com
Read current articles by Yisrayl Hawkins @ www.yahwehsbranch.com

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